Web Cartography without Flash


Recently I found some interesting examples on how to build an interactive map without Flash but using HTML5 and JavaScript instead. This seems to open new possibilities to visualize free and open data. Avoiding Flash would also be more congruent with the open source idea.

1) migrationsmap.net   –   via webappers.com

The migrationsmap code is available on github!

2) American Migration Map for Forbes   –   the editor Jon Bruner describes on his blog how he created the map.

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More things you can do with Open Data


I recently came across the blog by Marian Steinbach. There are some interesting visualizations using open data from long time air pollution measurement in Nordrhein-Westfalen (Germany) as well as radiation data from Germany and Japan. Hava a look:

 

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Data visualisation – design competition by Postgrad.com


There is still a week left in a design competition by Postgrad.com. It started with a Tweet by information designer David McCandless on data about black students at Oxford and other UK universities.

See the details of the competition here.

A post on the guardian’s datablog was also inspired by this data.

Here is a video of a TED talk by David McCandless on data visualisation:

 

I had a look at the data and the links provided on the competition website and have come up with some visualisations of relations in the data that seemed most interesting to me:

 

Popular JAC2 subject groups in 2010 by white applicants aged 20 and younger

Popular JAC2 subject groups in 2010 by black applicants aged 20 and younger:

Data Sources:

http://www.ucas.com/about_us/stat_services/stats_online/annual_datasets_to_download/

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Altk3Tn01ZsWdHFqVkpjZFJZek5mM0NUekNldEdSZ2c&hl=en_GB#gid=4

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AonYZs4MzlZbdHF0WnNfTE1xZVU4YnhnWlZJbGVyTHc&hl=en#gid=0


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People living near nuclear power plants in Germany


I actually wanted to post this a week ago but due to lazy Easter holidays it comes a bit delayed. The topic however is still in everybody’s minds. Gregor Aisch has produced an interesting visualisation for the ZEIT magazine. It shows that in a densily populated country like Germany many people would be affected by a nuclear disaster like in Fukushima. Japan is densily populated too, however there the people seem to be more concentrated in large cities than in Germany. I heard about 80.000 people were living in the evacuation zone near Fukushima. In Germany an evacuation radius of 20km would affect 856.000 people for the plant in Neckarwestheim alone and 1.7 million around Philipsburg in case of a 30km radius. 5% of the country’s total population live within 20km of a nuclear power plant, 12% within 30km and 51% within 80km.

The south west of Germany is an earthquake risk area. However no strong quakes like in Japan have been recorded there. The strongest was 6.5 on Richter scale in Basel (CH) in 1356.

Gregor Aisch © ZEIT ONLINE - http://opendata.zeit.de/atomreaktoren/#/en/

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Fortress Europe


I had the topic refugees and Europe before when pointing to a map by Philippe Rekacewicz about the Schengen border. Now it is on the agenda again since the fortress Europe worries about the growing number of “intruders” and the lack of a consensus on how to deal with them (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13109631). The data journalism specialist OWNI has a nice interactive map on that topic:

http://owni.fr/2011/02/18/app-la-carte-des-morts-aux-frontieres-de-leurope/

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The invisible threat


The latest catastrophic news from Japan leave the impression that the disaster in Fukushima is more and more developing into Chernobyl-Dimensions. The course of events however is different in Fukushima compared to Chernobyl. Since the impact of the 1986 nuclear meltdown seem to be more and more forgotten but come back to peoples minds these days I browsed the web for some maps that show the distribution of the radioactive fallout after Chernobyl.

The Times Complete History of the World (2007), p. 351.

Source: Wikipedia

I also found this interesting “children-friendly” interpretation of the disaster in Fukushima:

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Thematic Mapping with OpenStreetMap


OSM user SK53 shows on his blog what potential exists in the OSM-data. Together with population related Super Output Areas from the British Government an interesting map on the pub density in the UK has been developed. The data quality of OSM however is not consistent throughout the UK but nevertheless I think some interesting relations can be seen in the map. The focus map on London shows how the pubdensity is concentrated in the center and is relatively low in the suburbs.

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